Course Details

Applied Robotics

This robotic fundamentals course aims to provide you with basic knowledge of key robotic concepts and their role in industrial manufacturing. The course breakdown is as follows. First, the core robotic principles along with a brief history of the industrial revolution is presented. The topics covered will enable you to classify different types of robots and identify various robot based on their function. Second, we will provide you with fundamentals about the power and movement systems for basic robotic functioning within the manufacturing industry. Next, we will introduce you to different types of sensors, their working and applications. This will be followed by an explanation of computer systems used in robot controllers. Basic high-level programming concepts such as syntax and application logic gates will be presented. We also will elaborate on the importance of maintenance and a systematic approach to problem solving for robotic system applications. Finally, scenarios and possible applications for robots will be discussed to provide you with ideas of what to expect in your careers as robotic systems engineers.

Recommended Prerequisites

Basic Reading Comprehension, Basic Computer Skills, Basic Internet Browsing Skills

What You’ll Learn

Course Module Listing

Overview

Pre-Course Survey

Course Introduction

Module 1: Control Systems

Module Introduction

Lesson 1: Overview of Control Systems

Lesson 2: Number Systems

Lesson 3: Logic Gates

Lesson 4: Overview of Programming

Lesson 5: Computer Systems

Module Summary

Module Assessment

Module 2: Robot Maintenance and Troubleshooting

Module Introduction

Lesson 1: Overview: Maintenance vs. Troubleshooting

Lesson 2: Preventive Maintenance

Lesson 3: Troubleshooting

Module Summary

Module Assessment

Module 3: Case Study and Future of Robots

Module Introduction

Lesson 1: Case Study

Lesson 2: Future of Robotics

Module Summary

Module Assessment

Review

Exam

Post-Course Survey

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DUE-1104181. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are hose of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.