Aircraft Weight and Balance2019-07-28T06:19:05+00:00
Course Details

Aircraft Weight and Balance

This course is designed to partially fulfill the curriculum requirements as set out in Appendix B Part 147 General Curriculum Subjects for Aviation Maintenance Technician Schools established by the Federal Aviation Administration Regulations.

This course will help you learn the importance of weight and balance, the understanding of which is critical to the safety of the people and cargo onboard and to the aircraft itself. You will also learn what to look for when examining weight and balance records. In addition, you will learn how to calculate center of gravity, aircraft weight, and load balance. All of this knowledge is necessary for the technician’s ability to apply the theory of weight and balance of aircraft in the real world and be successful in their future career as aviation maintenance technicians.

Recommended Prerequisites

Basic Reading Comprehension, Basic Computer Skills, Basic Internet Browsing Skills

What You’ll Learn

Course Module Listing

Overview

Pre-Course Survey

Course Introduction

Weight and Balance Control

Module Introduction

Weight and Balance System

Need and Requirements for Aircraft Weighing

Weight and Balance Terminology

Module Summary

Module Assessment

Procedures for Weighing an Aircraft

Module Introduction

General Concepts

Weight and Balance Data

Weight and Balance Equipment

Preparing an Aircraft for Weighing

Module Summary

Module Assessment

Loading and Extreme Conditions

Module Introduction

Weighing the Aircraft

Loading an Aircraft for Flight

Center of Gravity Range

Weight and Balance Extreme Conditions

Lab

Module Summary

Module Assessment

Graphs, Records and Other Considerations

Module Introduction

Equipment Change and Aircraft Alteration

The Use of Ballast

Loading Graphs and CG Envelopes

Helicopter Weight and Balance

Weight and Balance for Large Airplanes

Weight and Balance Records

Module Summary

Module Assessment

Review

Exam

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DUE-1104181. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are hose of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.